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Clean Energy Research Laboratory

CERL Equipment with staff

The Clean Energy Research Laboratory (CERL) is used to conduct research on hydrogen production, heat engines and nanotechnology. Currently, researchers are working on the world’s first lab-scale demonstration of a copper-chlorine cycle for thermochemical water splitting and nuclear hydrogen production. Hydrogen is a clean energy carrier of the future and potentially major solution to the problem of climate change.

Officially opened in September 2010, the Clean Energy Research Laboratory (CERL) is a cutting-edge laboratory that pioneers clean energy research and discovers major new energy solutions to the problem of climate change. CERL’s mission is to develop clean energy technologies and move them from the laboratory to commercial and industrial application. Current research projects in CERL include hydrogen production, heat engines (specifically a Marnoch heat engine), chemical heat pumps, and nano- and micro-scale energy systems.

Through a $10 million project over a five-year period, CERL researchers are working on the world's first lab-scale demonstration of an integrated copper-chlorine cycle for thermochemical water splitting and nuclear hydrogen production. The 33-member UOIT-led team comprises eight collaborating institutions and universities from five countries, six industrial partners and two local organizations in Durham Region.

Hydrogen is a potentially major solution to the problems of climate change and depleting conventional fuels. It is a clean fuel that can be used to heat our homes, supply fuel for vehicles, power our equipment, and for many other everyday applications that currently use oil, coal or natural gas. Using nuclear, solar or other heat sources (such as waste heat from industrial plant emissions), the Cu-Cl cycle promises to achieve higher efficiencies, lower environmental impact and lower costs of hydrogen production than any other existing technology.

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